Winnie the Pooh Fans Outraged by Horror Movie Turns Piglet and Puh into Sick Serial Assassins

Fans of Winnie the Pooh reacted with horror this morning after discovering the family favorite is to be transformed into a horror movie in which Pooh and Piglet become ill serial killers.

One social media user said they were “devastated” by the decision, and Winnie the Pooh should stay “holy.”

AA Milne’s Winnie the Pooh tales are a world-famous children’s classic, inspired by films like Christopher Robin – but now Jagged Edge Productions is turning a dark eye on the lovely characters.

Blood and Honey is described by IMDB as a horror movie following Pooh and Piglet as they go on a rampage after Christopher Robin leaves them.

In the new film Winnie the Pooh becomes a serial killer in a distorted story featuring character favorites alongside humans.

Blood and Honey is based on a family favorite Winnie the Pooh, a series of AA Milne stories.

Winnie the Pooh may have his familiar yellow head and red shirt, but that's where the similarities end.

Winnie the Pooh may have his familiar yellow head and red shirt, but that’s where the similarities end.

In this Jagged Edge Studios movie, Winnie the Pooh is a savage serial killer after being abandoned by Christopher Robin

In this Jagged Edge Studios movie, Winnie the Pooh is a savage serial killer after being abandoned by Christopher Robin

Actors in the film, which is still being filmed, were amazed at the attention it has already received.

The film is only now possible because the rights to the Winnie the Pooh stories came into the public domain earlier this year.

This means that anyone wishing to use the characters or concepts of everyone’s favorite yellow bear now does not have to apply for permission or pay copyright fees.

Shortly after Mr Milne’s death in 1956, his widow sold the rights to Winnie the Pooh to Stephen Slesinger, who later sold them to the Walt Disney Company.

The rights were shared between Milne’s widow and three other organizations, all of which sold their rights to Disney in 2001.

Although the rights to the original Winnie the Pooh characters have now expired, Disney still has copyright over its own version of the bear, as well as all the movies and images associated with them.

Blood and Honey’s plot is still unclear, but it is based around how Pooh and Piglet learn to survive after being abandoned by Christopher Robin.

The pair search the Hundred Acre Forest for casualties when Pooh becomes a sick serial killer – with a piglet his evil companion.

Forced to live on their own, the two turn to a life of crime and slaughter, becoming wild beasts.

This still from the film has worried fans of the yellow bear, as the film seems to overturn the innocence of childhood.

This still from the film has worried fans of the yellow bear, as the film seems to overturn the innocence of childhood.

This excerpt screams horror film as two people go to a seemingly abandoned building under the heavy rain.

This excerpt screams horror film as two people go to a seemingly abandoned building under the heavy rain.

Rhys Frake-Waterfield, who wrote and directed the film, said: “They are no longer domesticated: they are like an evil bear and a pig that wants to go around and try to find prey.”

The film will star Craig David Dowsett as the honey-loving bear and Chris Cordell as Piglet.

It will also feature characters whose names include Alice, Mary, Caged Man and Mauled Woman.

But characters introduced in the books later as Tiger will not appear in Blood and Honey because the copyright for those has not yet expired.

POOH BEAR: STILL LOVED BY MILLIONS AFTER 90 YEARS

AA Milne’s Winnie the Pooh stories are based on the adventures of his son Christopher Robin with his toy bear “Growler” in Ashdown Forest, Sussex.

Christopher Robin Milne’s toys – Piglet, Eeyore, Kanga, Roo and Tigger – were incorporated into the stories.

Pooh first appeared in the London Evening News on Christmas Eve, 1925, in a story called “The Wrong Sort Of Bees”. The stories became an instant hit here and especially across the Atlantic.

Despite being declared a pacifist, he served during World War II as Captain of the Home Guard. Milne died in January 1956 at the age of 74.

Fans of children’s stories mostly shouted at the new film for ‘ruining’ the works and their own childhoods.

Furious social media users reacted online, with one post: ‘Will you really ruin Winnie the Pooh like that? Nobody asked for this. ‘

Second added: ‘Winnie the Pooh is in the public domain and we get this from it?!?!?! I’ll stay with the Hephalus! ‘

Others claimed that the new film would “destroy” the character for those who enjoyed the books during childhood, as well as for future generations.

One Twitter user remained “destroyed”.

They wrote: ‘I am destroyed. Some things should be sacred, and Puh certainly is. ‘

But not all social media users oppose the plans – as one such user has shown: “Winnie the Pooh is turned into an R-rated horror movie. Yes really. That’s why I love the public domain.”

Meanwhile on the production company’s Instagram, Jagged Edge Productions, users were ripped off about the frames revealed by the film.

While one user declared the movie “looks awful,” another said, “I didn’t realize how much I needed a horror movie of Winnie the Pooh in my life.”

Alan Alexander Milne’s Winnie-the-Pooh stories were first published in 1926, when the author found inspiration in watching his own son Christopher Robin play with his nursery toys.

These well-known and capricious tales of honey-pots and hawks in the Hundred-Acre Forest seemed to portray an idyllic and innocent world that revolved around a particularly cheerful little boy treading through the woods in his buttocks.

Winnie the Pooh's famous yellow ears are almost visible behind the wheel of this car in the scary pictures.

Winnie the Pooh’s famous yellow ears are almost visible behind the wheel of this car in the scary pictures.

AA Milne used painstakingly drawn images for the front covers and illustrations in his stories

Disney's adaptation of Milne's work is loved around the world

Milne’s stories are now in the public domain meaning that characters such as Pooh can be used in any form of artistic interpretation.

Pooh is known in Disney movies as kind, honey-loving and quite confused

Pooh is known in Disney movies as kind, honey-loving and quite confused

This makes the departure into the world of horror even more exciting – as Blood and Honey seeks to change the legacy of the works forever and question the reality of child innocence.

Like the Winnie the Pooh books, Milne was also a successful poet and playwright, and wrote many of his best poems during the First World War.

It is unknown at this time what he will do after leaving the post.

Disney UK has been contacted for comment.

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